CSU Electrical and Computer Engineering Department

Retrospect

Dr. Dan Simon, Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, is the pioneer for this project. He was always interested in robotics field and his PhD dissertation at Syracuse University was in the area of robotics. He joined Cleveland State University in 1999 where he has encouraged students interested in robotics and has supervised several robotics-based Masters theses.     

In January 2007, the CSU Provost's Office announced the availability of funding for “Research Experiences for Undergraduates” (REU). The purpose of the funding was to allow undergraduates to get involved in faculty research, and to generate research results that could improve the visibility and reputation of CSU. REU, funded by the Provost, also provides students actual hands on experience. The Deans of six colleges and the Director of the Honors Department at CSU asked their faculty members to submit proposals for undergraduate research projects. Dr. Simon submitted his proposal to the Provost through the honors department. The Provost approved the funding for the robotic swarms project which is one of the biggest projects under REU.

Dr. Simon's interest in proposing the project included several aspects.

  1. The proposal included funding for himself over the summer to supplement his nine-month salary.
  2. The proposal is in line with his interest in embedded systems, robotics, computer intelligence, and control theory.
  3. The results of the project are expected to produce an infrastructure (i.e., functioning robots) that can be used as a basis for further fund raising and research. In particular, this project will provide the basis for an NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) proposal that will be written by Dr. Simon and submitted in August 2007. This project is not considered merely as a final goal, but rather as groundwork for greater follow-up efforts.
  4. The project is expected to result in robotics products that can potentially be used for further research by honors and graduate students under Dr. Simon's supervision.